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Time for a gut check.

June 3, 2011

Let me preface this by saying that I apologize for the dead horse beating and that we’ve been discussing this issue to the exclusion of some other things.  Like most of the rest of the Giants community, it’s hard to get our minds away from the situation, especially given that new wrinkles in the increasingly muddled drama surrounding Buster’s injury keep cropping up.

That said, one of the drawbacks of having two of us around here is that, well, you’ve got two people with pent up thoughts to get out.  Sorry about that, and I hope I’ll make it worth your while to stick with this.

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I’m not going to start like every major sports writer’s piece that I’ve read with “what happened to Buster Posey was awful” or  some variant thereof.  You’re here, reading, voluntarily, so I’m taking it on faith that we’re at about the same level of panic and despair and stomach turning agony still over this.

You can blame a lot of people and a lot of things for what happened.  You can blame the rules.  You can blame fate or luck or chance or the baseball gods or the BABIP dragon if you want to.  You can even, if you really want to, blame Scott Cousins.  I’d disagree with you on that one, but I’ve seen the argument made.

The one person I cannot and will not tolerate being blamed or vilified in this situation, though, is Buster Posey himself, which is why Logan Morrison’s comments today struck such a nerve.

Scott Cousins is having anything but an easy time in this whole mess.  I’m sure there’s a lot of emotional toll that comes from being on the other end of this scenario and the death threats are completely beyond uncalled for.  They’re horrific and not representative of the kind of class I’d like to see from Giants fans.  If I was a Marlins fan, I’d be disgusted and distressed by what’s happened.  Even as a Giants fan, I can manage to have enough perspective on the incident to defend Morrison’s comments about Cousins and the difficulties he’s had.  Cousins is a friend and a teammate and that’s what I would expect of anyone.  Criticize Sabean’s comments all you want, because much as I understand where he’s coming from I can acknowledge that they were not the most politically correct or well thought-out ever.  But criticizing Buster Posey for not immediately accepting Cousin’s outreach is beyond the pale.  If the general public wants to turn Cousins into a victim, fine, I can accept that.  But what I cannot accept is Buster Posey, who is in pain and scared and hurting and dealing with a situation that may be rougher mentally even than physically, being blamed for not taking time right now to talk to Cousins.

What happened to Buster Posey is awful.

That sentence is very telling.  It’s what happened to Buster Posey.  No one else, not even to the Giants as a whole.  Not even to us as fans, as destroyed as we feel.  There is a man, a soon to be father and an all around class act, whose friends are worried about him, who is hurting and struggling when he should be thriving and focused on his career and family and his coming children.

And you know what, as a Giants fan, frankly, I just don’t want to hear about it any more, not because I bear any ill will towards Cousins or want to downplay the seriousness of his involvement in the scenario and the effects for him, but because it makes me sick.  It makes me sick that I’m having to defend Buster.  It makes my stomach turn every time I see a picture of him being bowled over or crumpled on the ground in agony next to a headline like it’s just some spectacle.  It makes my heart clench in my chest every time I catch a glimpse of yet another replay of the collision, as if seeing it as it happened wasn’t enough of that feeling of horror and knot in your stomach, abject despair the first time.

So let me repeat.  What happened to Buster Posey is awful.

Now let’s get back and make another run at it.  Why not?

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